Monthly Reads – August

There are lots of books I’ve already started and am looking forward to reading this month. With a bit of time off, I thought now was a good time to share what I’ll be getting stuck into. I’m hoping to review as many of these as possible so keep an eye out.

Have you read any of these? Please let me know which you’ve enjoyed and any recommendations in the comments.

Boy Parts by Eliza Clark

‘Irina obsessively takes explicit photographs of the average-looking men she persuades to model for her, scouted from the streets of Newcastle.

Placed on sabbatical from her dead-end bar job, she is offered an exhibition at a fashionable London gallery, promising to revive her career in the art world and offering an escape from her rut of drugs, alcohol, and extreme cinema. The news triggers a self-destructive tailspin, centred around Irina’s relationship with her obsessive best-friend, and a shy young man from her local supermarket who has attracted her attention…’

Published by Influx Press. Out 23 July 2020.

Miss Iceland by Auður Ava Ólafsdóttir (Translated by Brian FitzGibbon)

‘Named after one of Iceland’s most magnificent volcanoes, Hekla always knew she wanted to be a writer. In a nation of poets, where each household proudly displays leatherbound volumes of the Sagas, and there are more writers per capita than anywhere else in the world, there is only one problem: she is a woman.

She decides to try her luck in Reykjavik, and moves in with her friend Jon, a gay man who longs to work in the theatre, but can only find dangerous, backbreaking work on fishing trawlers. Hekla’s opportunities are equally limited: marriage and babies, or a job as a waitress, in which harassment from customers is part of the daily grind. They both feel completely out of place in a small and conservative world.”

Published by Pushkin Press. Out 30 July 2020.

True Story by Kate Reed Petty

‘Startlingly relevant and enthralling in its brilliance, True Story is by turns a campus novel, psychological thriller, horror story and crime noir, each narrative frame stripping away the fictions we tell about women, men and the very nature of truth. It introduces Kate Reed Petty as a provocative new voice in contemporary fiction.’

Published by Quercus Publishing. Out 4 August 2020.

Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stewart

It is 1981. Glasgow is dying and good families must grift to survive. Agnes Bain has always expected more from life. She dreams of greater things: a house with its own front door and a life bought and paid for outright (like her perfect, but false, teeth). But Agnes is abandoned by her philandering husband, and soon she and her three children find themselves trapped in a decimated mining town. As she descends deeper into drink, the children try their best to save her, yet one by one they must abandon her to save themselves. It is her son Shuggie who holds out hope the longest..”

Longlisted for the Booker Prize

Published by Picador Books. Out 6 August 2020.

What are you going to be reading this month? Let me know your highlights!

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